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Four “4th of July Reasons” to Attend HR West Seattle!

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, June 29, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Have you registered for HR West Seattle yet?


With July 4
th right around the corner, HR West Seattle will be here before you know it. There’s still some space available, so if you’ve yet to decide whether or not to attend this one-day super-charged HR conference, we’d like to give you four good reasons why you need to be there!


4.  Get the credits you need, in one incredible day…HR West Seattle “Best of the West” includes 16 concurrent sessions, all for recertification credit toward your SHRM-CP, SHRM-SCP, PHR, and SPHR. This conference is approved for 5 Strategic Business Credits and 5 General HR credits. See icons in individual session descriptions for Strategic Business Credits.

 

3. Discover and digest the excitement of the Future of HR! Keynote Steve Cadigan, CEO of Cadigan Ventures and former VP of Talent at LinkedIn, will be your guide (this session also qualifies for Strategic Business Credit).


2. It's a Friday Event! Arrive early, and stay late...treat yourself to summer getaway in downtown Seattle (fun for locals too)! Get inspired and re-energized by the urban energy and Pacific tranquility of the Grand Hyatt Seattle—a spectacular conference center and a luxury hotel under one roof. Book your room here.


1. Register by Friday, July 1st and save! With so many HR professionals taking it easy this holiday weekend, what better time to sit back, relax, click and register?

Yes, the full conference is just $50 through this Friday!

Register Today AND SAVE.


Stay connected!
Be sure follow the HR West news, highlights and other offers on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+ and Instagram. Also check out (or check in, if you are already a member) the HR West LinkedIn Group.

#HRWest2016 #Seattle 

Tags:  HR West  HR West 2016  HR West Seattle 

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HR Communication Tip: Say What You Want… Not What You Don’t Want.

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, June 22, 2016

By Paul Endresscoach, speaker, and founder of Maximum Advantage International. 

Endress will present Adapting Your Communication Style to Get Results at HR West Seattle on July 15, 2015. Go to www.hrwest.org/seattle for more information and to register for the conference.

This article was recently published on: www.paulendress.com

The Mind Can’t Directly Process A Negative
So Say What You Want… Not What You Don’t Want

In this post, I’m going to give you a tip that you can use to instantly improve your communication, and it comes from something that happened to me recently.  So here’s what happened.

My wife and I went out to dinner at the Harvest Café.  It’s a great place we love to go there.  Sometimes it’s a little slow for us because I’m usually in a hurry, but we went there and then we just were sitting down to enjoy it.  Then I saw this sign that they had up in there and (upon reading it) I thought, what better way is there to do this? Because it’s going to reveal a good communication truth that you can put to use right away.  The sign said, “Don’t forget to vote for 2016 Simply the Best.”

This local magazine, here in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, has a contest where people submit votes for the best restaurant and then once a year they publish a special issue, then the restaurant can use that in their advertising. -- i.e. “Yes, we are the best restaurant in Harrisburg.” So they’re putting up a sign that says, “Don’t forget to vote.”

This is a great example of the effective communication principle that says: the mind cannot directly process a negative.The Mind Cant Processs A Negative - Small

There’s a famous story about Fran Tarkenton, who was a quarterback for the Minnesota Vikings. They’re in the championship game with two minutes left, and he goes to the sidelines. The game is within reach. They’re six points back, they’ve got to score a touchdown — two minutes.  Which if you don’t know football, that’s plenty of time to score the touchdown if you’re playing well!

Fran says to the coach, “What should I do?”  And the coach says, “Fran, no matter what you do don’t throw an interception.”  An interception is where he accidentally throws it to the other team and that’s exactly what happened when he went back on the field because what had the coach put in his mind?  “Don’t throw an interception.”

The interception might have happened for other reasons, but one of them is that the mind can’t directly process a negative word like “don’t.”  So when something says, “Don’t forget to vote,” the words that we really get are: “Forget to vote.”

“Don’t throw an interception” becomes “throw an interception.”

What could they have done differently? Change it to say, “Remember to vote.”  Which is the positive version of what they want you to do instead of the negative version!

Changing the wording from a negative to a positive greatly increases the chances that people are going to remember to vote for them instead of forget to vote for them.

Putting It To Use

The next time you need to get somebody to do something, and you need to give an instruction, give it instruction in a positive way.  Tell them what you do want... not what you don’t want.

Ask yourself this question: In what situation do you express yourself in terms of what you don’t want --- how can you flip that around and turn it into a positive so you say what you do want instead of what you don’t want?

Just flip it around, express it as a positive.

And whenever you think about this, just think about:  “Remember to vote” versus “Don’t forget to vote.” 

Small change, big difference, great results.

You can also listen to/"watch" Paul discuss his communication style tip on YouTube.*

About the Author

Paul Endress is an in-demand coach, speaker, and founder of Maximum Advantage International, a company that gives organizations and individuals the skills necessary to communicate effectively in an increasingly difficult business environment.

An inspiring speaker, Endress is the author of Dealing With Difficult People and has helped thousands of individuals and business executives from companies such as Shell and Mitusbushi through his seminars, speeches, and products.

His latest project is the Communication Styles 2.0 model and software, which is based upon eight years of research and solves communication problems by creating visual models of interactions between group members.

*Adapting Your Communication Style to Get Results 
HR West Seattle - July 15 • 03:05 PM - 04:05 PM

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Tags:  business communication skills  effective communication skills  Executive Coaching  HR  HR coaching  HR Management Skills  HR West 2016  HR West Seattle  Paul Endress 

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Connect with Others at HR West!

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Thursday, February 25, 2016

By Karen Rodriguez

HR West is right around the corner! Many HR professionals will attend with the goal of connecting with peers and getting their message across. Whether networking with a group, conducting a small session or presenting a keynote address, your communication skills play a large part in how well you deliver your message and connect with others.

Eye contact is essential.

People have a hard time trusting someone who doesn’t look them straight in the eyes. While making eye contact can be difficult with one-on-one conversations, it’s even more difficult when networking with a group or presenting to an audience.

Anyone who has taken a public speaking class has likely been told to “scan the room.” The idea is to make eye contact with as many people as possible to get your message across. However, we’ve seen this method increase anxiety and make you appear less genuine.

When speaking to a group at dinner or during a training session, the best approach is to look at one person at a time for a complete thought, “One person: One thought.”

Each thought should last around five to seven seconds. That’s long enough to make a connection but not too long that it turns into a creepy stare. Following this approach will:

1.       Decrease your stress level. Looking at one person for a full thought simulates a one-on-one conversation. For that thought, everyone else will disappear and you will automatically calm down.

2.       Reduce “ums” and “uhs.” When you make eye contact, you are less likely to use filler words. As a result, you will sound more knowledgeable and credible.

3.       Help you avoid distractions. As you focus on one person, the audience member texting in the back of the room, the people walking in late, and the banter of a group across the room won’t distract you.

4.       Create connections. Not only does eye contact keep your audience’s attention, it demonstrates that nothing is more important to you than them in that moment. When you show your commitment to your audience, they will feel connected.

Focus on your audience and they will give you their attention. And, only speak when you make eye contact. The best communicators focus more on others and less on themselves.

For more communication skills tips, check out The Chat.  
There's still time to register for HR West 2016 - March 7-9, 2016 at the Oakland Convention Center in Oakland, California. 

About the Author

Karen Rodriguez is a passionate marketer, designer, and communicator. With over 15 years of experience, Karen Rodriguez currently manages Exec|Comm’s global brand including their online presence, web-based learning center, advertising, PR, classroom materials, and live special events. She recently launched the firm’s blog, The Chat, and lunch & learn series, The Learning Exchange. Additionally, she manages the delivery and expansion of Exec|Comm’s open-enrollment seminars in Chicago, Dallas, New York, San Francisco, and San Jose. Karen holds a BFA from Parsons, The New School for Design in New York City.  She lives in Aberdeen, NJ, with her husband and three sons.

Tags:  communi  communication  Exec-Comm  HR  HR conference  HR education  HR Leadership  HR West 2016  human resources management  interpersonal communication  Karen Rodriguez  NCHRA 

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Fair Hiring Practices: How To See The Human Behind The Record

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, February 24, 2016

 

By Max Wesman, VP of GoodHire - HR West 2016 Power Station Sponsor

Nearly 70 million people in the United States have criminal records. That means you will almost certainly encounter job candidates with records at some point in your career.

How you (and the hiring managers you work with) react will likely depend on your understanding of the laws that govern hiring, the candidates’ openness, and something that can’t be overlooked: feelings.

A Charged Issue: Criminal Records In Hiring

For most people, discussing criminal history is, frankly, uncomfortable. Think about it: The incident probably represents a low point in the candidate’s life, and few people relish discussing their lowest moments in a job interview.

At the same time, even seasoned HR professionals and hiring managers tread carefully when discussing criminal history out of their own unease, concern about applicable laws – or both.

Twenty states, including California, and many cities have passed “ban-the-box” laws that govern how and at what point in the hiring process employers can ask about criminal records. In San Francisco, for example, employers can’t ask about convictions until after an initial live interview.

As a result, a background check often serves as the first mention of a criminal record.

Background Checks: A Useful But Limited Tool

Having run tens of thousands of background checks over the past three years, I’ve seen first hand how employment screening can help companies build great teams. But I’ve also seen that it’s far from a perfect solution.

That’s because, without context, records in a background check tell only part of the story – that a conviction occurred. The records say nothing about why or what has happened since.

Without that context, employers run the risk of excluding otherwise qualified candidates. Worse, excluding people with criminal records from consideration could attract unwanted attention from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which has strengthened its focus on the disparate impact of policies on protected classes.

Context Is Everything: EEOC Guidance And Hiring Best Practices

A survey of California employers found that most are more willing to consider hiring a candidate when they know the nature of the offense. For example, 84% said they’d be willing to hire someone with a misdemeanor offense.

That openness turns out to be a good thing, because considering individual circumstances and context around a criminal record is a best practice for avoiding EEOC scrutiny. Other best practices include considering the nature and gravity of the offense, the time that has passed since the offense or completion of the sentence, and the nature of the job sought.

Asking for context, which may show rehabilitation, good character, or successful performance of similar work after the conviction, gives you a more complete picture. And it helps you avoid dismissing an otherwise qualified candidate – a big consideration in a hot labor market.

Yet the question of how to get that context brings us right back to the original problem: people’s reluctance to discuss criminal records.

A Technology Assist: Comments For Context

Here in Northern California, we tend to look to technology for answers. And I believe technology can help smooth the way for these necessary, though difficult, conversations.

Giving hiring managers a tech-based way to request context around background check results makes the request simply part of the process. Think of it as similar to requesting e-consent to run the background check in the first place.

Technology can also help on the candidate side. A solution that lets candidates enter comments directly on their background check results helps them tell their circumstances outside of the stressful job interview environment. In an ideal solution, the context provided would stay with the candidates’ results, so anyone authorized to view those results would get the same information.

At GoodHire, we’re working on this challenge now as part of our commitment to fostering trust, safety, and fairness throughout the hiring process.

Soon, employers who use GoodHire services will be able to ask candidates to add comments for context through the GoodHire product. And, if candidates have already added comments as part of their own job search process, any authorized employer who runs a background check through GoodHire will see the context provided.

Rehumanizing Employment Screening

According to the National Employment Law Project, many companies that hire people with records find them to be model employees. The group quotes Brad Friedlander, CEO of Red Restaurant Group, as saying that people with criminal records “are frequently the most dedicated and conscientious. A lot of doors are shut to them, so when someone gives them an opportunity, they make the most of it.”

An innovative technology solution that promotes context on background check results can help employers get a more complete picture of their candidates. It doesn’t necessarily take the place of in-person discussions, but it can make those conversations easier to start.

In doing so, it promises to help employers see the human in their potential resources.

Want to learn more about comments for context?
GoodHire
Look for team GoodHire at HR West 2016
!

About the Author

Max Wesman has led GoodHire from its launch in 2012. Today, GoodHire serves more than 23,000 businesses, and Max oversees all aspects of its services, from strategy to product development and design, to legal compliance, to customer support. Before joining GoodHire, Max managed and launched enterprise solutions and small business software products for Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft. He received an MBA from the University of California Berkeley's Haas School of Business and undergraduate degrees from the Wharton School and the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Tags:  background checks  EEOC  fair hiring  fair labor standards act  good hiring  goodhire  Hiring  HR  HR Blog  HR Management  HR West 2016  Human Resources  Max Wesman  NCHRA  Recruiting 

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2016 HR Legislation Predictions

Posted By Laurie A. Pehar Borsh, Wednesday, February 17, 2016

2016 HR Legislation Predictions 

You don’t need a crystal ball to predict that workplace issues will generate a lot of buzz this year—President Obama made as much clear in his last State of the Union address. With lawmakers focusing on equal pay, paid family leave, and more at the federal and state level, it’s a sure bet that 2016 will see a wave of changes in the world of compliance. Here’s our HR legislation forecast:

1. States and municipalities, not Congress, will look to close the gender pay gap.

While Congress failed to pass the Paycheck Fairness Act last fall, the prospects for gender pay equality have never been stronger. President Obama's proposed EEO-1 rules could go a long way, but it's legislation at the state level that will make the biggest impact.

The California Fair Pay Act took effect earlier this year and has already been called the toughest of its kind in the country. Following suit, New York passed its own take with the 
Achieve Pay Equity Bill. The success of these new laws could spur other states to take matters into their own hands. Massachusetts looks to have already done so, with their state senate scheduled to take up the issue this week.

2. Several states will act on paid leave, which will feature heavily in the presidential race.

In an election where the environment, economy, and terrorism were expected to be the focus, paid leave has taken much of the spotlight. Candidates from both parties have put forth paid family leave proposals, some more far-reaching than others. There are only three states (New Jersey, California, and Rhode Island) with paid family and medical leave laws, but national attention could prod lawmakers to act. Earlier this month, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo asked his state’s legislature to make it priority and the District of Columbia is expected to pass one of the country’s most ambitious family leave laws this year.

3. ACA requirements will become very real for employers.

Ready or not, here it comes: welcome to year one of ACA reporting. Employers have had two years, with a few welcome delays, to prepare. Knowing this, the IRS and Department of Labor may not monitor with the leniency some are hoping for. DOL auditing alone has reportedly gone up 300 percent year-over-year.

Hoping for an eleventh-hour reprieve? With the Supreme Court yet again turning down appeals to review the Affordable Care Act, the law looks safe for at least this year.

4. The Cadillac Tax will come one step closer to the scrapyard.

Things aren’t looking pretty for the so-called Cadillac Tax. With every major presidential candidate and90 Senators and 290 House representatives openly against the tax, its delay last month likely served as a preview of things to come. Facing pressure from Republicans and even his own party, President Obama could relent in exchange for concessions on other initiatives, like paid leave.

5. New overtime rules will make a big splash in 2016.

The summer’s biggest blockbuster might come from the Department of Labor, which is expected to unveil new overtime rules this July. The change would raise the minimum salary for overtime exemption from $23,660 to $50,440. In other words, that means that every worker, regardless of their duties, will be eligible for overtime if they make less than $50,440. That’s a big deal, especially for white collar workers. Expect your HR department to take a long, hard look at employee classification this year if they haven’t already.

Those are just some the year’s top stories that we’re keeping tabs on in our new HR newsroom.  With workplace issues on the forefront of voters’ minds, some could feature heavily in this year’s presidential race. As for that other big 2016 prediction?

Reply hazy, try again.  

 

About the Author

Andy Przystanski is HR Content Specialist at Namely, the all-in-one HR, payroll, and benefits platform built for today's employees. Connect with Andy and the Namely team on TwitterFacebook, and LinkedIn.

Namely is a Platinum Sponsor of HR West 2016, March 7-9th at the Oakland Convention Center. Visit Namely's Booth #6 to learn how all-in-one HR technology paired with expert brokers makes HR management easier. 

 

Namely CEO, Matt Straz will present session #610, Hiring for High-Growth.  

 

Register for HR West today. 

 

Tags:  aca  cadillac tax  HR  HR Legislation  HR West 2016  human resources  Matt Straz  namely  NCHRA  overtime  paid leave  payroll 

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