CEO's Corner
Blog Home All Blogs

Hosted by Greg Morton, CEO, NCHRA
"Industrial Relations," "Personnel," "Human Resources," "Human Capital" -- it seems as if the terms are always changing! This blog spotlights those individuals who are shaping the science around people and their purpose, in an unparalleled intersection of technology and humanity.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Greg Morton  Ceo Corner  HR Leadership  NCHRA  HR  CEO  HR Experts  HR tech  HR West 2016  Certification  HR Management  HR TechXpo  HRCI  hrwest  human resources management  Innovation  innovators  SHRM Letter  Advisory Council  Amy Schabacker Dufrane  art of productivity  Capital One  CEO's Corner  CHRO  Clif Bar CEO  conference  council  danika davis  David Swanson  Employee Experience 

Charlene Li on Technology and Employee Experience

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, June 27, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, June 27, 2017

This week my CEO's Corner post puts a spotlight on Charlene Li, Principal Analyst at Altimeter (a Prophet Company) and keynote at this year’s HR TechXpo. Li supports leaders to thrive with disruption, primarily focusing on creating business strategies and developing leadership around digital, social, and emerging technologies. An analyst since 1999, and having seen business, society, and the world undergo seismic changes over the last 18 years, she’s driven to create research and thought leadership that helps to bring greater clarity and inspire audacious actions.

Read this article on the new CEO CORNER.

 

Tags:  CEO Corner  CEO's Corner  Employee Experience  Greg Morton  HR Experts  HR Leadership  HR Tech  HR TechXpo 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Conversation with Michael Papay, CEO and Co-founder of Waggl

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, July 12, 2016

A proven HR technology pioneer with over 15 years of domain experience, Michael Papay is CEO and Co-founder of Waggl, a San Francisco Bay Area company that provides a simple, cloud-based solution to help organizations listen to people, distill insights and make improvements. He is a frequent author and contributor to advancing the thought leadership around organizational learning and employee engagement. Papay believes that mutual respect and active listening leads to more meaningful relationships and productive organizations. 

Companies now want an engaged workforce and employees want to know that their opinions count. dynamic pulsing platform to enable focused communication, Waggl offers a solution that fits this ever-present need. I wanted to know what Michael thought about the role of HR and how it continues to change in conjunction with today's new technologies and trends.

Q:  What are some of the most pressing challenges faced by HR professionals today?

A:  The workplace has become extraordinarily complex, and is only becoming more so every day.  Most organizations aren’t properly organized to cope with digital transformation. Deloitte's 2016 Global Human Capital Trends Report surveyed 7,000 HR and Business Leaders from 130 countries and found that 92% of HR and business leaders believe that redesigning their organization is a top priority in the coming year. All of this complexity puts HR professionals in the difficult position of having to serve as the compass for the human beings that work in these organizations as they navigate tremendous change.  This requires the ability to have a real-time, two-way dialogue in which everyone has the opportunity to be heard, so that business leaders can access the intelligence of the entire organization.  It also requires the ability to communicate new ideas quickly and effectively, so that the organization can achieve alignment on key initiatives as they are introduced.

 

Q:  How can Waggl's pulse surveys change the way HR professionals approach these challenges?

A:  HR technology often aims to help with efficiency and improve processes.  But beyond that, pulse surveys can provide a way for HR and business leaders to really tune into the wisdom in the system. The people who are on the front lines dealing with customers every day hold a great deal of valuable knowledge, but in many cases, they don’t have a direct line of communication with executive management.  The traditional means of listening and drawing insights from a large group of employees has been the annual survey, which takes months to administer and is already out of date by the time it is received.  Similarly, most people want real-time feedback in order to improve their performance on a continual basis, rather than sitting down with a manager only once a year.  Pulse surveys are a great way for organizations to communicate more frequently and authentically with their workers, and also enable HR and business leaders to quickly surface ideas and achieve alignment.

Q:  In such a complicated business environment, does it really make more sense to add more technology and tools into the mix?

A:  As we head deeper into the new era of digital disruption, HR and business leaders will need to take a more active role in encouraging technical innovation in order for the entire organization to be successful.  According to a recent report from Cisco, IMD, and the Global Center for Digital Business Transformationby neglecting digital workforce transformation, companies are failing to build the capabilities that they will need to succeed in an era of digital disruption.  The report describes the steps that an organization can take to digitize its people-related processes in order to build a workforce that is highly agile, innovative, and engaged – factors that will enable the organization to create value for its customers, partners, and for its own employees.

 

At Waggl, we believe that works needs to be more human, and that listening to people is valuable.  Our utilization of technology strives to help strengthen connections, distill insights, and create a 2-way dialogue that allows people to contribute, and feel more engaged and motivated. Our aim is to make it easier for HR leaders to better manage the cultures  of their organizations, and to connect and engage with their people through a common sense of purpose. We build trust within the workplace by giving employees a voice and a set at the table.  The ultimate goal is to provide a better way for everyone to make a difference.

 ... a sponsor of HR West Seattle, July 15, 2016
Learn more about Waggl 
Follow Michael Papay on Twitter: @Papay3
Follow Waggl on Twitter: 
@waggl_it
Connect with Michael Papay on Linkedin
Please follow me on Twitter: @GregJMorton
Connect with me on Linkedin

Tags:  CEO  Ceo Corner  Greg Morton  HR  HR Tech  HR West 2016  HR West Seattle  Innovation  NCHRA  Waggl 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Conversation with Matt Straz, CEO & Founder, Namely

Posted By Greg Morton, Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Matt Straz is a thoughtful entrepreneur and HR tech innovator. As the founder and CEO of Namely, the leading HR, payroll, and benefits platform for mid-sized companies, Matt has enjoyed some success in recent months. This past February, Namely raised an additional $30 million in venture backing led by previous backer Sequoia Capital, bringing the company’s total to $107.8 million. The company, now four years old, processes over $2.5 billion in payroll with over 75,000 employees on the Namely platform. But it’s people—and building technology to bring out their best—that Straz is the most passionate about.

I sat down with Matt to talk about the year’s biggest issues in workplace legislation, what makes Namely special, and what the recent focus on employee experience means for HR.

What is unique about the challenges for HR professionals in mid-sized business compared to small businesses?

Matt Straz: Part of what makes my job so interesting is I get to hear from HR professionals every day. We work with a lot of hyper-growth companies, and they experience challenges in nailing HR administration. They’re looking to successfully onboard dozens of employees at once, properly run payroll, enroll everyone in affordable employee benefits, and keep the heart of the company together while growing.

But when it comes to mid-sized businesses, we often see HR faced with two very important priorities. The first is no surprise: It’s still HR administration. That need doesn’t go away, of course. The second priority is more strategic: It’s providing a meaningful employee experience. Deloitte just had a great write-up on this in their 2016 Global Human Capital Trends report. Mid-sized companies, now that they have some of the basics of administration handled, are hungry to offer the kind of fulfilling, career-growing experience that ups employee retention and productivity. Mid-sized companies are ready to really bring their performance management to the next level. Review cycles and compensation conversations should be standardized company-wide, and cascading goals across the entire organization are more important now than ever.

At the end of the day, it’s your company culture that fuels a rewarding employee experience. Culture isn’t necessarily a conscious decision when you’re a smaller business. The founders and first 10 employees essentially define your company by means of their backgrounds and sensibilities. When you grow to be a mid-sized business, a well-defined and motivating company culture is absolutely essential—as is consistent internal communication. We see our clients focusing more on making certain that company policies are clear, and surveying their people on everything from benefits to time off to snacks. In mid-sized businesses, we also see our clients using cascading goals—goals that start companywide and then trickle down from executives to managers to individual contributors. That way, everyone’s efforts map directly back to those of the company.

Here in California, one bit of HR-related news that’s dominated the headlines is our new minimum wage—$15 by 2022. Think we’ll see more of the same elsewhere?

We probably won’t see Congress budge on the federal minimum wage, which is $7.25, until the next administration at the soonest.

Instead, we’re seeing states take the lead. California is a great example, but New York and Oregon just passed significant increases as well. In both of these states, legislators opted for a regional model with different minimums for urban and rural counties. It’s a clever approach that’s meant to address how someone’s cost of living or purchasing power can vary widely within state borders.

For those who’ve opposed minimum wage increases in the past, mainly under the belief that they would hurt businesses in rural or suburban towns, this new flexibility is a game-changer. Don’t be surprised if we see movements pick up steam in states like Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Illinois later this year.

Minimum wage increases aside, what are some of the other big developments in HR this year?

New regulations at the state and city level are impacting mid-sized companies like never before. Equal pay, paid leave, and laws limiting criminal background checks have gotten a lot of traction. Just in the past month, New York state passed an historic paid leave law granting up to 12 weeks for new parents or those with a sick family member. As unprecedented as some of these state laws are, a few cities are going even further. San Francisco just passed an ordinance requiring businesses to pay for the 45 percent that isn’t covered by California's program—giving the city the first “full paid leave” program in the country. HR professionals everywhere should keep an eye on their own local laws.

But as important as those developments are, the biggest story we’re watching is the Department of Labor’s changes to overtime rules. The minimum salary to exempt someone from overtime currently sits at $23,660. Under the new rules, we could see that go up to $50,440 or even higher. That means nearly a quarter of all employees currently exempt from overtime will have to be reclassified.

The new rule hasn’t been finalized yet, but it’s expected to arrive around late spring or early summer. We expect that the DOL will give companies 60 days to comply once the rules are released. If you’re in HR, don’t wait—you need to start looking at your overtime classifications right away.

There are so many new HR technology companies coming on to the scene. What makes Namely different?

I called out two of the biggest HR priorities for mid-market companies earlier. Both of them are exactly what we built Namely to solve. While there are lots of great, emerging point solutions, we offer the first integrated HR, payroll, and benefits platform built to fully handle HR administration for mid-sized companies. And on top of that powerful functionality, employees also love using Namely. We believe great software certainly contributes to a great employee experience. We’ve always placed an emphasis on building software that is intuitive, with a clear user interface like the consumer technology people use every day. When HR technology is easy to use for everyone—not just administrators but managers and employees as well—that means a better working experience.

Also, as we’ve discussed, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and rapidly changing regulations at local, state, and federal levels have forced mid-market companies to prioritize compliance more than ever. Namely’s all-in-one technology automates ACA reports and enables our clients to satisfy today’s complex payroll and benefits requirements. While we’ve built our technology to support local and federal legislation, we’ve also hired people who have deep experience across HR, payroll, and employee benefits to help keep our clients compliant. We track the most crucial updates in workplace legislation over on Namely’s HR News.

Namely has the deep administrative functionality and compliance that mid-sized companies need, and we’ve built it to be simple enough for every employee to use every day. If we can help our clients give their people an even better employee experience, we know we’ve done our job.

Follow me on Twitter: @GregJMorton
Follow Matt Straz on Twitter: @MattStraz


Tags:  Greg Morton  HR  HR Leadership  HR software  HR tech  Matt Straz  Namely  NCHRA 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)