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Hosted by Greg Morton, CEO, NCHRA
"Industrial Relations," "Personnel," "Human Resources," "Human Capital" -- it seems as if the terms are always changing! This blog spotlights those individuals who are shaping the science around people and their purpose, in an unparalleled intersection of technology and humanity.

 

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HRCI CEO Amy Schabacker Dufrane Shares Thoughts on the Present and Future of HR

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Amy Schabacker Dufrane, Ed.D, SPHR, CAE, is CEO of the HR Certification Institute, where she focuses on developing collaborative long-term partnerships with individuals and organizations looking to create and deliver change around human resources. Before joining HRCI, she spent more than 25 years in leading human resources functions within nonprofit and for-profit organizations.

HR practiced well – which is what HRCI is all about – ensures that organizations hire the best, support employees to perform their best, and align their human capital with the organization’s business goals.

I wanted to hear Amy’s thoughts on the present and future role of HR and how HRCI is raising the bar on how HR leads business. 


What does a 21st-century HR organization look like? What skills beyond traditional HR subject matter knowledge do HR professionals need if they are to be successful?


The most important resource of any organization – and in fact, business as a whole – is its people. The most powerful way an organization can differentiate itself is through its people – because people are what’s behind every product and service. To be successful, today’s HR professionals must understand the business they work for. They need to understand what they are selling, what their organization’s challenges are, and what their customers and employees are saying. In short, we need to be business leaders who can think and strategize. 

We can no longer just be the “rules and tools” people.  

We need to be able to look at data from finance and marketing and think about HR from the perspective of how do we hire the right people and how do retool the people we have. 

We need to be able to ask, and answer, the right questions: What do we need to do from a strategy perspective? Who do we need to be here to make the changes we need to make, not tomorrow, but five years from now? How are we going to get there? Do we work with colleges and universities to identify the talent we need so we can put the right training and education in place? It’s about being able to make recommendations about what the future looks like from a human capital standpoint. 

We also need to think about how we brand our company. It used to be “come and work for us, we have great benefits and we will pay you well.” Now, to entice people to come work for you, you have to clearly differentiate your workforce and your workplace and your products or services as something that that’s interesting and appealing to be a part of. 


What would you say to a CEO about the importance of the HR function in their company?

HR’s role in business is so fundamental. Never before have we seen this necessity for HR and anything that is going on in business to be 100% in alignment. Good HR people who have earned accredited professional credentials perform better and are more invested in their career and their profession. And there’s large-scale research that proves that. Professionally credentialed HR pros are in it for the long haul. They are committed to making sure they understand the fundamental elements of HR and how to protect their organization and move it forward. This requires competencies in leadership and development and analytical thinking, all of which are elements of being certified at a more senior level.


What do you think about the notion that with all this automation and artificial intelligence, robots will replace HR? 

I think that technology and innovation are presenting opportunities that greatly enhance HR. Think about how we used to do performance evaluations. It was paper-driven, once-a-year conversation whose impact was pretty much limited to the sphere of the supervisor and their direct report. Today, we have a rapidly growing array of technologies that allow supervisors and staff to deliver, receive and integrate feedback continuously and across entire organizations, enabling managers, employees, teams, departments and entire companies to learn, adapt, evolve and perform at the highest levels. While automation has reshaped and eliminated certain jobs and technology can be expensive, even the smallest companies are becoming more and more sophisticated. Automation and AI are allowing us to work smarter. With AI we now have technology that helps us figure out how work gets done and who is involved. It’s HR’s job to figure out how to put that technology to work for us. This is very exciting, and I see this as HR’s challenge in the digital age – how to put technology to work for us to help our employees work smarter.

To learn more about HRCI, got to: www.hrci.org 

Follow (HRCI) on: 
LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/hr-certification-institute
Twitter – https://twitter.com/HRCertInstitute
Facebook –  https://www.facebook.com/hrcertificationinstitute
YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/user/HRCertInstitute?feature=guide

Connect with Amy: 
Twitter – @HRCI_CEO 
LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/amydufrane



Greg Morton is a corporate strategy and growth development specialist and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern California HR Association.

To comment on this article or ask (name of person interviewed) additional questions, please post below, tweet to @GregJMorton or connect with Greg on LinkedIn (using #CEOCorner with all social media posts).

 

 

Tags:  Amy Schabacker Dufrane  CEO  Ceo Corner  Certification  Greg Morton  HR  HR Education  HR Leadership  HR Re-Certification  HRCI  Innovation  innovators 

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Conversation with Michael Papay, CEO and Co-founder of Waggl

Posted By Greg J. Morton, Tuesday, July 12, 2016

A proven HR technology pioneer with over 15 years of domain experience, Michael Papay is CEO and Co-founder of Waggl, a San Francisco Bay Area company that provides a simple, cloud-based solution to help organizations listen to people, distill insights and make improvements. He is a frequent author and contributor to advancing the thought leadership around organizational learning and employee engagement. Papay believes that mutual respect and active listening leads to more meaningful relationships and productive organizations. 

Companies now want an engaged workforce and employees want to know that their opinions count. dynamic pulsing platform to enable focused communication, Waggl offers a solution that fits this ever-present need. I wanted to know what Michael thought about the role of HR and how it continues to change in conjunction with today's new technologies and trends.

Q:  What are some of the most pressing challenges faced by HR professionals today?

A:  The workplace has become extraordinarily complex, and is only becoming more so every day.  Most organizations aren’t properly organized to cope with digital transformation. Deloitte's 2016 Global Human Capital Trends Report surveyed 7,000 HR and Business Leaders from 130 countries and found that 92% of HR and business leaders believe that redesigning their organization is a top priority in the coming year. All of this complexity puts HR professionals in the difficult position of having to serve as the compass for the human beings that work in these organizations as they navigate tremendous change.  This requires the ability to have a real-time, two-way dialogue in which everyone has the opportunity to be heard, so that business leaders can access the intelligence of the entire organization.  It also requires the ability to communicate new ideas quickly and effectively, so that the organization can achieve alignment on key initiatives as they are introduced.

 

Q:  How can Waggl's pulse surveys change the way HR professionals approach these challenges?

A:  HR technology often aims to help with efficiency and improve processes.  But beyond that, pulse surveys can provide a way for HR and business leaders to really tune into the wisdom in the system. The people who are on the front lines dealing with customers every day hold a great deal of valuable knowledge, but in many cases, they don’t have a direct line of communication with executive management.  The traditional means of listening and drawing insights from a large group of employees has been the annual survey, which takes months to administer and is already out of date by the time it is received.  Similarly, most people want real-time feedback in order to improve their performance on a continual basis, rather than sitting down with a manager only once a year.  Pulse surveys are a great way for organizations to communicate more frequently and authentically with their workers, and also enable HR and business leaders to quickly surface ideas and achieve alignment.

Q:  In such a complicated business environment, does it really make more sense to add more technology and tools into the mix?

A:  As we head deeper into the new era of digital disruption, HR and business leaders will need to take a more active role in encouraging technical innovation in order for the entire organization to be successful.  According to a recent report from Cisco, IMD, and the Global Center for Digital Business Transformationby neglecting digital workforce transformation, companies are failing to build the capabilities that they will need to succeed in an era of digital disruption.  The report describes the steps that an organization can take to digitize its people-related processes in order to build a workforce that is highly agile, innovative, and engaged – factors that will enable the organization to create value for its customers, partners, and for its own employees.

 

At Waggl, we believe that works needs to be more human, and that listening to people is valuable.  Our utilization of technology strives to help strengthen connections, distill insights, and create a 2-way dialogue that allows people to contribute, and feel more engaged and motivated. Our aim is to make it easier for HR leaders to better manage the cultures  of their organizations, and to connect and engage with their people through a common sense of purpose. We build trust within the workplace by giving employees a voice and a set at the table.  The ultimate goal is to provide a better way for everyone to make a difference.

 ... a sponsor of HR West Seattle, July 15, 2016
Learn more about Waggl 
Follow Michael Papay on Twitter: @Papay3
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@waggl_it
Connect with Michael Papay on Linkedin
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Tags:  CEO  Ceo Corner  Greg Morton  HR  HR Tech  HR West 2016  HR West Seattle  Innovation  NCHRA  Waggl 

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